Fairy Tale Scrapbook
onestarbookreview:

“This is a good book because it shows how you can be ugly and still move on.” 

onestarbookreview:

This is a good book because it shows how you can be ugly and still move on.” 

traleeanna:

Me.
[The ugly duckling] felt quite glad that he had come through so much trouble and misfortune, for now he had a fuller understanding of his own good fortune, and of beauty when he met with it.
"The Ugly Duckling," Hans Christian Andersen
fashionpr0n:

"The Ugly Duckling" Makeup by Tal Peleg

fashionpr0n:

"The Ugly Duckling" Makeup by Tal Peleg

thecoldpaw:

The Ugly Duckling
Pen on Paper
8.5”x11”

thecoldpaw:

The Ugly Duckling
Pen on Paper
8.5”x11”

fairytalemood:

La princesse au petit pois illustrated by Nina Caniac

on tumblr

thegrimmexperience:

The Princess and the Pea (PencilBones)

thegrimmexperience:

The Princess and the Pea (PencilBones)

fairytalemood:

"Fairy Tales" by Andrea Farina

aliciavel:

The Princess and the Pea

This illustration was a gift for my friend Pompondesign ^^

bbagreen:

The Princess and The pea

Illustrated by Michael Foreman

bbagreen:

The Princess and The pea

Illustrated by Michael Foreman

1los:

Pied Piper of Hamelin

1los:

Pied Piper of Hamelin

allthingslinguistic:

Pied-Piping Day: A holiday the origins of which you may not be aware
A few days ago (July 22) was Pied-Piper’s Day, a holiday in honour of the Pied Piper of Hamelin. 

in which the piper is a rat-catcher hired by the town [of Hamelin] to lure rats away with his magic pipe. When the citizenry refuses to pay for this service, he retaliates by turning his magic on their children, leading them away as he had the rats. This version of the story spread as a fairy tale.

Pied-piping is also the name for the linguistic process of bringing a preposition along with a moved wh-word. Presumably the wh-word is the piper and the preposition is the rat or child. 
1. With what shall we celebrate Pied-Piping Day? 2. On which day shall we celebrate pied-piping? 
The opposite of pied-piping is preposition-stranding, where the preposition is left (stranded) in its original position. 
3. What shall we celebrate preposition stranding with? 4. Which day shall we celebrate preposition stranding on?
Although in the beginning, this fairy-tale reference probably seemed rather fanciful, by now pied-piping is the completely standard name for this phenomenon. Wikipedia says more about its origins: 

In linguistics, pied-piping is a phenomenon of syntax whereby a given focused expression takes an entire encompassing phrase with it when it is “moved”.[1] The term itself is due to John Robert Ross;[2] it is a reference to the Pied Piper of Hamelin, the figure of fairy tales who lured rats (and children) by playing his flute. Pied-piping is an aspect of discontinuities in syntax, having to do with the constituents that can and cannot be discontinuous.[3] While pied-piping is most visible in cases of wh-fronting of information questions and relative clauses, it is not limited to wh-fronting, but rather it can be construed as occurring with most any type of discontinuity (extraposition, scrambling, topicalization). Most if not all languages that allow discontinuities employ pied-piping to some extent, although there are major differences across languages in this area, some languages employing pied-piping much more than others.

Another intersection of linguistics and fairy tales are the Brothers Grimm, who were not only the folklorists who wrote down tales like Cinderella and Hansel and Gretel, but also very early linguists who discovered Grimm’s law of historical sound change from Indo-European to Germanic languages (which explains how Latin “pater” and German “Vater” and English “father” are all related). Pretty cool stuff. 
(via Arnold Zwicky’s Blog) 

allthingslinguistic:

Pied-Piping Day: A holiday the origins of which you may not be aware

A few days ago (July 22) was Pied-Piper’s Day, a holiday in honour of the Pied Piper of Hamelin

in which the piper is a rat-catcher hired by the town [of Hamelin] to lure rats away with his magic pipe. When the citizenry refuses to pay for this service, he retaliates by turning his magic on their children, leading them away as he had the rats. This version of the story spread as a fairy tale.

Pied-piping is also the name for the linguistic process of bringing a preposition along with a moved wh-word. Presumably the wh-word is the piper and the preposition is the rat or child. 

1. With what shall we celebrate Pied-Piping Day? 
2. On which day shall we celebrate pied-piping? 

The opposite of pied-piping is preposition-stranding, where the preposition is left (stranded) in its original position. 

3. What shall we celebrate preposition stranding with
4. Which day shall we celebrate preposition stranding on?

Although in the beginning, this fairy-tale reference probably seemed rather fanciful, by now pied-piping is the completely standard name for this phenomenon. Wikipedia says more about its origins: 

In linguistics, pied-piping is a phenomenon of syntax whereby a given focused expression takes an entire encompassing phrase with it when it is “moved”.[1] The term itself is due to John Robert Ross;[2] it is a reference to the Pied Piper of Hamelin, the figure of fairy tales who lured rats (and children) by playing his flute. Pied-piping is an aspect of discontinuities in syntax, having to do with the constituents that can and cannot be discontinuous.[3] While pied-piping is most visible in cases of wh-fronting of information questions and relative clauses, it is not limited to wh-fronting, but rather it can be construed as occurring with most any type of discontinuity (extrapositionscramblingtopicalization). Most if not all languages that allow discontinuities employ pied-piping to some extent, although there are major differences across languages in this area, some languages employing pied-piping much more than others.

Another intersection of linguistics and fairy tales are the Brothers Grimm, who were not only the folklorists who wrote down tales like Cinderella and Hansel and Gretel, but also very early linguists who discovered Grimm’s law of historical sound change from Indo-European to Germanic languages (which explains how Latin “pater” and German “Vater” and English “father” are all related). Pretty cool stuff. 

(via Arnold Zwicky’s Blog

ulteriorfirmament:

Pied Piper of Hamelin

ulteriorfirmament:

Pied Piper of Hamelin

cotton-sheep:

Here is the first graphism homework we had (a month and a half ago or so).
Yes I’m slow to update!
We had to choose a tale and illustrate it in black and white (ink) using superpositions.
I chose The Pied Piper of Hamelin.

cotton-sheep:

Here is the first graphism homework we had (a month and a half ago or so).

Yes I’m slow to update!

We had to choose a tale and illustrate it in black and white (ink) using superpositions.

I chose The Pied Piper of Hamelin.

deborayumi:

O Flautista de Hamelin

deborayumi:

O Flautista de Hamelin